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that has a lot of potential to open up better avenues for educators and districts to make better decisions and get evidence in a way and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're doing a lot easier. >> you are the designated responder here. >> thanks for bringing this great panel. i am not going to spend time adjusting all of them. it will make this proposal better and stronger. for the younger people in the audience may be 30 years you will be on a panel like this and somebody will ask what it was like before the apps store. people will be shocked not because you are old but they can't imagine life existed before the apps store. it is so incredible and what made the market? where does it come from? what it is is transparency about what you're getting and barriers to entry. what we want to do is take the entrepreneurial energy in the u.s. and around the world and use it to give teachers better tools and consumer report for educational technology to educate the entrepreneurial energy developing better schools so the panel has got it right in terms of what we are trying to do. t
to be the guy who is very conservative, catholic, he's got a great education track record but i think is going to be well-positioned to be, if we're going to modernize someone we feel safer, he could be the guy. >> one last word on the millennials since we did have that question. according to the data i missing, it doesn't look like obama shares the millennial vote, its operational shores -- is creeping up. he did win it 66-32 in 2008. he's not there yet, 34-point margin. the pupil had about a 30-point margin. that's getting close. 56% of what all is said and done he may be wind up with a bird outside margin among millennials, but just not as big as he had in 2008, and, of course, another related question is whether and to what extent these votes will turn out. in 2012. so keep in mind in 2008 it wasn't that astronomical. >> the racial mix. >> absolutely right. >> the white millennials are noticeably more liberal. >> he was at 55% among whites under 30. in our poll we have him down to 50. >> that's pretty good. but anyway, short answer is looking pretty good for obama, maybe not quite as good
is innovation, we continue to lead on this. how do we take that creative engine and get it to k-12 education so we we can see improvements and qualities and outcomes and achievements for our students? >> if you look through history, whether it is transportation, our children listed in age that our ancestors could only dream of. we have computers, we have all sorts of new things. that really doesn't seem to happen until k-12 education. if you look at research and development, in k-12 education, it is one 15th the rate, of the u.s. economy overall. it is 152-1100 rate of what we see in innovative sectors like health care. what is getting in the way? well, what we try to do is first diagnosed what is giving away. i wonder standing back, we see what can we do about it. and that is essentially a layer in which we hope to create a creative marketplace that succeeds in what normally seems to be stagnant. we have k-12 schools, 14,000 school systems. we have would-be innovators and entrepreneurs. if something seems to be separating us. what is going on in the middle? this is underlined a lot of other co
at this testimony. i would like to begin by thanking you for your genuine passion on this topic can educate all americans about the importance. i know is we've spent time over the years, we think about of course your home state and robust aviation community in the state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of the most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with bea. and with that said tamayo so juxtaposed my thoughts and comments regarding matches the home base of operation that i come from at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion in the air space challenges have across places like the metropolitan area and here i am the metropolitan area. all of this site, mr. chairman and certainly two ranking member costello as well, and over the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they had been in your congressional districts across the country and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. your palate hearings, conduct of information on sessions and have an open door as he sought not to assign
are perhaps the most important innovation in public education over the last generation in the united states. but there are many myths and misconceptions about charters and about the motivation and the goal of many in the movement. use of some of that play out in the recent chicago future strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states to the best charters are either an unmitigated good or alternatively, an existential threat. .. >> if we are going to get back to the living standards of america, we are only going to do that by lifting up and truly changing public education in this country. that is the only way that is ever going to be achieved. so with that, let me introduce roland fryer. he is going to summarize his paper. he is going to do 34 slides in one hour. >> thank you very much. it is great to be here again and to see so many familiar faces. >> let's start with this first. good morning. we all know that education in america, visited the show that our performance has grown over the last 30 to 40 years. if you look at the latest statistics as to how many schools didn't
such as employment, education, homeownership and business ownership. what do you make of that? and as governor, what would you do to address it? >> i think it's all about jobs. we need more people getting taxpayers a number of people living off the government. you know, my wife and i have given so much back to the st. louis city schools at roosevelt high school, for the past six years we've been knee-deep in the problem center city. and by the way, we 50,000 kids now with normandie going the other way and not accredited schools, 50,000. philip busch stadium standing room only. we need more people employed in the state. we need more opportunity, we need more dreams to be fulfilled and we are simply languishing at the bottom of the barrel almost every economic category. you know, a lot of education is leadership and it starts at the top. i think there's well-intentioned people. were starting to show signs of progress and it was. we been in there. we've been in the trenches. for six years we've been trying to find a solution to the problems. kansas city, we can help getting it going from the ideas we h
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
. that's folds. false. they make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have
, and my fathermented us to have an education, and he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i think he thought all of us would just come right back home and try to work from there, but i grew up with lots of family and community support. i grew up, went to a segregated school. when they -- when brown versus board of education passed, georgia's answer was to just throw up these schools to supposedly give us equal, separate, but equal facilities so i only -- i only attended segregated schools, but in those schools, we had people who cared. we had teachers who cared, but they all -- one thing they drilled into us in the church, in our homes, and in the schools was that they expected us to do good. they expected us to go and do good and reach back and help others. [applause] >> it's interesting you say that because in the country right now, day three of the huge teacher strike in chicago so there's a battle right now for the soul of education, public education. >> yes. >> your daddy was killed by a white fellow. >> yes. >> go back to that time and what happened, what you kn
noncollege whites. 27% were college-educated whites and 12% were minorities. since then, the minorities doubled to 26%. the noncollege whites all the way down to 39%. you take reagan's share of the vote in 1984 among noncollege whites and protect them in the 2008 election, the other thing that changed is the democrats in the first decades after world war ii, come about again change in the 60s and 70s. seventys and 80s. college and noncollege, today in polling, it is nine or 10. i would argue that obama wins and once it gets done, it produces an environment in which all the numbers we are talking about, "a-team" 40. as you want, you want 80% of nonwhite voters. those voters represent the 20 present as they did last time. the internal composition of the white vote is changing in a way that makes it more accessible for him to get there. to me coming have to look not only at education but gender. it basically creates four quadrants. if you look at 2008, noncollege white man. a noncollege white women, he will drop. the fourth quadrant was the college-educated white women. in all polling, inc
an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives of my agents if i help this young man because that is not my job
education system to free up the knowledge to make it look attractive for minorities to have the desire to want to learn the way out to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> writing the book one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you w
is your educational policy? we don't have answers. the only thing is polarization is reducing political discourse into something that is simplistic to. not only the arab world is falling into that trap but we in the west read this situation to these lengths and egypt is in danger. too many men are wearing head scarves now. the symbol is dynamic and you can laugh but i am sorry to tell you the media coverage is too often the case that we are reducing the reality of a country on symbols. how many women and how many men. what is your position on sharia, if you use the term is over. that is the reality of the simplistic discussion we have. but once again what i am saying to the muslim countries in the arab world you cannot blame the west to reduce the political discourse. this is what is happening in the muslim countries themselves. this is the problem. by going beyond us, polarization is there and we have to move beyond us and we have to face -- this is the second part of the book. what i am trying to tackle, way forward. the critical questions that we have. we have five main areas where w
this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a dynamic principle leading a -- principal, leading a group of passionate, dedicated teachers at a school with a proud tradition to rally the community around. i found a scramble to help a surprisingly savvy group of kids who have been largely abandoned by the system. um, as most of you probably know, the book traces the pivotal 2009-2010 school year at reagan high, and we've been -- weaved in a lot of its history. not all, but
there through >> thick and thin, lost their house in a fire when they needed help with their education we were there and that is what families and friends do. i've been living in the real world, and as i have gone through what 114 counties, they are starving for honesty, someone they can believe in and real little practical knowledge. we have to be realistic about where we are. 40-hour out of the 50 economic growth in the last ten years. we are 50th in the states in job creation since 2008. and 1 million missourians on food stamps out of 6 million. is this truly the best we can do is this a legacy that we will leave for our grand kids and kids'. two relatives one side the declaration of independence and one sign of the constitution john rutledge both from south carolina. my middle name as rutledge. it is a dishonor to our ancestors to find out where we are in missouri right now. we deserve better leadership, and i plan to give it. >> thank you. jim higgins. >> the libertarian party has returned 40-years-old now last year. and i have been a libertarian for almost that amount of time. i first di
for education but we can keep it in this country but you still have to go through the process. there's a way of solving this. they key is for republicans and democrats to work together. berkley: there is a way to solve all of these challenges. and my opponent does a good game, the fact of the matter is that he doesn't track is right. is opposed to comprehension immigration reform. he's in favor of the arizona law that most was declared unconstitutional by the united states senate -- by the united states supreme court. my opponent thought the arizona law was so good he wanted to bring a tear to nevada, but the one thing, the one thing that i can't believe he is opposed is the d.r.e.a.m. act. and he voted against it. not 80%, not 20%. he voted against 100% of the. what does the d.r.e.a.m. act said? it says if you're a youngster that has come to the united states through no fault of your own and you're in college or you volunteer for our military, you should have a pass to legal status. it couldn't be any more simple than that, and my opponent voted against it and the also come he's on record s
representative has gone out too far from the constituency and then educate the elect rate about how the representative sideways with the will with the public opinion of the people. you take that ad that cross roads ran. we were running it in the states talking about how the president passed this stimulus program. the stimulus thing was wildly unpopular and the ads that the super pac can do is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they can. it can't change public opinion. we can identify places where an elected representative is sideways with the constituent and let people know about it. i don't know that i agree with it the premises of the question it's necessarily bad. i think it brings a to light a lot of things people wouldn't otherwise know. >> i think in the credibility product. i-- [inaudible] it would allow challengers and underfunded candidates if you were to just waive a wand to get rid of limits and allow teem contribute as much as they want to the candidates as long as it's disclosed the press and opponent could decide whether or not that is h
for educators and districts to make better decisions and help get evidence in a way, and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're trying to do a lot easier. >> thank you. >> i think you are the designated responder here. >> first of, it's great to get to the panel. it's fab it's aic. it there are so many good points to bring in the paper. i'm not going to spend time addressing all of them. afterwards i would like follow up with each you. it's going to make it better and stronger for for one note in the add yins you'll be on a panel like this what was life like before the app store. it they'll be shocked when you ask the question, not because you old but because they can't imagine what life was like before the app store. what you are seeing is incredible. where the imeerps and companies come from? what it is about transparency about you're getting. that's yew it's out there. you can count the things on your tablet and smartphone. we want to take the entrepreneurial innovation and use it to give teachers better tools in the classroom. that's what. the consumer report for educational
know it but public education is our most pressing public social moral compass. positions are entrenched and there is rhetoric on all sides. somehow we are at a point* frustration is that such us the rear that teachers are the villains and they're shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer i went looking in the pressure cooker of schools to raise test scores against the clock and what we're throwing away. instead i a mad passionate dedicated teachers that the community rallied around i found a group of kids that were largely abandoned by the system. the book traces said 20092010 school year at rated high. at that point* the school was rated academically unacceptable four years running from the state agency. this has practical real-world effects. letters% home saying you don't have to send your kids here. you can send them across the highway. that left the cast some that did not have the resources to get out that were abandoned but have to much loyalty because their big brothers and sisters went to reagan high. at the moment where i started to do research for the book with th
'll be waiting by the door if anyone wants information and websites to go to educate yourselves better about this. one more comment which is that natural family planning can be used 99% effectiveness, significantly greater than a lot of the contraceptives that -- >> thank you. >> have you looked at the population in south america recently? [laughter] no, let me answer this. i think that -- >> [inaudible] >> i believe what you said is valid. i really -- when i teach constitutional law and i deal with the issue offed sodomy and the laws against it in the united states, i ask the students why was it banned? okay? it's not just -- sodomy applies to both homo sexual intercourse, and i asked why was it banned in the united states? it was a dearly held belief, in which i share, which is when people get together to express love through sexuality, it should be an expression of love and not just the need to have a physical release because when -- we're using another human being for our own pleasure. i find that immoral, all right? however, it is absolutely true that what you're talking about does -- is not
, a viewer wants a little bit more from you on education. they write: i agree r agree with some of governor johnson's point but the view of education is backwards. do you want to clarify your education policy? >> guest: well, as governor of new mexico, i was more outspoken than any governor in the country regarding school choice. i really believe that to reform education we need bring competition to public education. that said, what's the best thing that the federal got could do to improve education in this country? well, i maintain it would be to abolish the federal department of education, established in 1979 under jimmy carter, there is anything from 1979 to suggest that the department of education has been value-add? i would argue know. the federal government gives each state 11 cents out of every cool that the state spends but they tell you have to do a, b, c, and d, and here's 11 cents, and when to accomplish a, b, c, and d, it costs 16 cents. so nobody really recognizes it costs money to take federal money. just get the federal department over education out of education. just get the
at a conference on counterfeit prescription drugs. she discussed the new fda initiative to educate consumers, called bsafe our ex. this conference was hosted by the partnership for safe medicine. the fda commissioner's remarks are 20 minutes. >> thank you. it's really a pleasure to be here once again with the partnership for safe medicines. this is a really important topic to me personally and professionally, and really given our shared shared commitment to make our nation drug supply safe, effective, secure and high quality as possible, the work with a partnership is very, very meaningful to us. they have been an important and reliable ally for fda, and we so value the work of the partnership. given the enormity of the challenge in front of us to protect the american people from contaminated counterfeit, substandard and other unsafe drugs at a time when the marketplace is global, when the speed of communications is near instantaneous and the money to be made through deception and fraud, it seems almost -- almost limitless. our goal is to make our already strong partnership even stronger and
in education. that investment is not limited to more money. it also means getting parents involved. it also means expecting more from everybody along whole education ecosystem, from administrators to policy-makers to teachers come expecting more out of everyone. so what i have on the table in san antonio is basically a 1/8 cent sales tax that will cost the median household in the city $7.81 per year. mind you, every day in texas, it cost $359.81 to keep a juvenile incarceration. what we have on the table is the opportunity to educate more than 22,404-year-olds with -- 22,400 4-year-olds with high quality pre-k. >> i don't believe that taxes are inherently evil. >> that will be tweeted, by the way. [laughter] give them a second. [laughter] >> i do believe that taxes are inherently evil. i'd like them and nobody likes the impaired but it will the voters in san antonio that there is no way to sugarcoat this. i am asking you for this tax increase. more than that, i believe in you. i believe that may put it in front of you, you can make a decision as to whether or not you want to make this inves
do anything to create a job, do anything to educate a child or do anything to bring down the deficit. but attempts at attacks and character assassination the way that mr. powell's been about tonight, frankly, make it a lot harder to solve problems, to compromise, to sit down and actually get something done. but i think that, mr. powell, you underestimate the decency of the voters of the seventh district, and i've had the privilege of representing this district for almost 12 years. and i can tell you we're honest and hard working people, and i have every confidence that the voters are going to reject your negative campaign. but i want to end this debate where we began. this election is about the future and about what kind of country we want to be. now, there's one path that i've advocated, lower taxes, less regulation that will produce more jobs. mr. powell's view is we need to raise taxes, we need government coming in and imposing regulation on businesses. but the fact is, we all know that the unprecedented prosperity of america did not come because the government just spent more mon
jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor jobs maybe it's possible only going to be possible if we once again get everyone starting something. so
issue of the 21st century are that, race and poverty, and, of course, education is, indeed, governor romney said it the other day, i had to look at the notes to see i had it right, and the criminal justice system because in addition to the discrimination that violates the law, job discrimination, discrimination in housing and housing finance and so on, we have what we all know in terms of the structural, institutional discrimination of how our schools ordinary reason and opee systemmings and michelle alexander and the new jim crow, published by the new press, has made so clear how our criminal justice system operates. now, that's the basic set of things that we talk about in the book. i also talk, and i won't go into it in great length here, but about poverty in relation to place. our inner cities, app -- appalachia, colonial south texas, all of that because that's where we have the persistent poverty where we have the intergenerational poverty, and it -- i found it very interesting. i was down in north carolina the last three days in the blue place in north carolina. you have to be
the michigan education association used their political clout to kill the bill. if costs were going to be cut by one of those cuts to go elsewhere. they wanted taxes to go up. that is what it's been happening in wisconsin. in wisconsin school districts districts and municipality simply didn't have the power to roll back some of those union benefits so they only solution to keep a service is going was higher taxes. unions were fine with that it wasn't until scott walker reforms which they protested vehemently and the school districts and municipality's gave the ability to get control of their budgets to bring cost and that is when we saw property taxes fall. government exists to serve the people. protecting the public in giving children get education not be good for cutting into it to families take him pay. the common good has to take tired or over the interest of any narrow group. government unions make this impossible. think about what collective pardoning powers do. means the governments, the people rather their elected representatives have to sit down with government unions and bargain wit
medicare, cuts to education and tax cuts to the rich, he's been very forceful about contrasting his views on things with what he says are the views to the other side which are sort of embracing a host of unpopular positions to these constituencies he's mobilizing the debates and had success with it and police tried to paint romney as an out of touch equity guide working-class person of the team that it's been fairly successful strategy particularly but only with the base but white working-class voters to be competitive in this election the obama team realized correctly there is a very off-putting thing about romney which is embodied in the republican party these days, but romney doesn't particularly without saying a word of the republican performance. it has been designed to optimize the things they might say that what really ticked off the base for the democratic party and raise concerns among independent voters. they probably couldn't have done much better captured by the elements that are far away by the level of conservatism and social issues, paul business of corrupting paul ryan and
the struggle that they have with their children's education. we know the struggle that they have with their mortgages. and we know exactly how hard they struggle to set aside pension savings, for 401k plans, that have been devastated in the downturn of the market. yes, the market is back to what was, but they lost four years of earnings in their 401k plans. now, they are told that they have to set aside another $150,000 before they retire. that is the romney-ryan plan. that is the message to middle america. but it's over for you and this is what we have to extract from you and the future, this plan is very bad news for middle-class working families in this country. >> i thank my colleagues for their leadership on these senses are medicare for seniors regularly take it to pre-lyndon johnson establishment of medicare, i told a story this morning, perhaps you weren't there. when i was very young, my father was very much a part of the john f. kennedy campaign for president. senator kennedy came to baltimore to talk about his campaign. and there was a tv show called senator kennedy an
at the brookings institution hosts a discussion on improving education including the pros and cons of charter schools and how to better use technology. that's at 9 a.m. eastern. at 2 p.m. we'll be live from the pentagon or a britain with defense secretary leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey. >> first thing in our article here is getting medicare costs under control is the number one priority. and it's the most untouchable thing. but that is going to cause more trouble than any other problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number one thing. >> you say we also surcharge smokers, and the o.b.'s for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> it came from us. i mean, i'm the person who put in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this comp something iran and the "washington post," i call them mega fasces and i was -- [inaudible] for being insensitive in which a guess i probably am. but this is another thing where everybody knows to be true, and someone
private prisons, education to more recently military and security issues has been put outward with much rhetoric, but not a lot of evidence in terms of cost effect it has, for example. my question is simply, how much reflects a blind faith in the precepts of the marketplace and adam smith and how much is attached to corporations that will benefit them in the future? i've written a book on the subject with respect to military contractors with little purple evidence. >> i see the correlation is inverted. it is more expensive and you get less out of it. we have seen how well halliburton dead when they took over the logistics of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sensitive surveillance intelligence. i don't want s
. but if you go into the educational context and you're talking about mobile on a smartphone and a lot of this access to, um, the broadband through mobile devices in minority communities in particular is via smartphones, i don't view that as an acceptable substitute for, um, netbook, laptop or desktop. and i met a woman many atlanta, um, who had a son in middle school who was in an advanced writing program, and one of the writing assignments was to edit a newspaper story. and the way you did it was at a homework site. you went on the site and downloaded the newspaper article, you edited it, and you then uploaded the edited article to the site where the teacher would have access to it, could mark it up, correct it and put it back on the site for you and your parents to see. and this was a family that did not have broadband in their home, and the woman told me she was signing up for it because of internet essentials, and when with i asked her, you know, well, what do your kids do now, she told me the story about this assignment. i said, well, how did your son do the assignment? well, he
on the stage today without my comprehensive school education. [applause] so britain gave me -- so britain gave me, my family a great gift to my parents never have come to a safe secure childhood. and you know my parents didn't talk much about their early life. it was too painful. it hurts too much. the pain of those they lost, the guilt. but i believe that their experience that they brought up with david and myself differently as a result because having several assaults, date instilled our duty to ease the struggles of others. and this came not just from my parents experience, it came from the fabric of our childhood. there were toys and games. i was actually it dallas fan, believe it or not. [applause] so of course there was a normal thing, but every of bringing a special and mine was special because of the place of politics within it. when i was 12 years old, another south african friend of my parents. her name was ruth brooks. full of life, full of laughter. and i remember a few months later coming down for breakfast, see my mom in tears because she had been murdered in the south african se
all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no limitation on jurisdiction. somebody can come into court and say the constitution promises me a job and i don't have a job. what are you judge is going to do about that? on the one hand it's very wonderful not to have these barriers and on the other hand it's quite a problem for the court because the court cannot actually effect giving that plaintiff of job, and so it's left in a situation where there's lots of promise that had been given the court can't fulfill so there is a gap that has grown of expectations and field promises. maybe john marshall in the early justice salt around the corner. i don't know but they decided early on that they were going to be barriers to entry. the one last historical call point i wou
. borrowing, not to invest in hospitals and education and hospitals, but want to keep people idle. so the next time you heard a conservative say to you, labour would increase borrowing, just remember, it is this a government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we have seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. i don't think that's what people were promised. now look, there will be some people who say, and this as an important argument, a single people say there is a short term pain, but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see, the longer you have low growth in our country, the bigger the death toll becomes for the future, and the bigger our problem will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work, that's not just that for the prospects now. it's bad for the prospect the whole of the rest of their life. into a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get up and running again during a recovery. so when david cameron says to you, well, let's just carry on as we are and
pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the factory of the universal secondary education and it was universal post secondary education to the extent that we could do that. we have the world's best infrastructure, bandwidth etc. then we had the world's most open and the sentry half century to increase the most energetic and talented around the world to start 40% of the new countries in silicon valley and the best rules for the capitol formation to prevent the recklessness and incentivize risk-taking. and last we had the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of c
to pass what was described as significant domestic legislation that addresses problems with education and medical care. mitch mcconnell, leader of the senate republican party, has told us repeatedly that his primary priority was defeating barack obama in 2012. it is readily understandable why he does not wish to emulate senator kennedy and thus enable obama's reelection. one could easily say newt gingrich made a mighty contribution to reelecting bill clinton. in 1996 by giving him a welfare bill that he was surprised to discover that clinton would sign. it may be the weakness of the candidacy would have doomed to regardless but in many ways the election was over. that kennedy embrace so-called welfare reform and republican legislation that was passed. what we learned in american politics was americans fixate on the president and blame warm praise the president for what ever happens. congress gets very little credit or more to the point of a presidential candidate of the opposition congress that works well with a president gets very little credit for their good sportsmanship. what they
secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like you when i become part of this? >> well, obviou
and women make different choices in the workplace. they make different choices starting in education. you see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far h
. we talked about education. during my time as governor, we put in place the largest bond package to expand our higher ed institutions in the history of the commonwealth, and now there's significant construction at both george mason and the northern virginia community college campuses and expanded preconsidered -- prekindergarten. we landed marquee companies hilton, volkswagen of north america, northrup gum monday announced they were coming to the neighborhood. we also won accolades as the best state for business every year of my four years as governor. i'm proud of those accomplishments, i'm proud that we did them together. but i'm especially proud that we did 'em in the midst of the worst e are session -- recession since the 1930s. today we're here because we have a senate to be fixed. we've got to fix congress to end gridlock that's blocking progress to important goals. we have to grow an economy, and to do it we level the playing field for small business, we invest in infrastructure projects like rail to dulles, and we win the talent race that will enable us to outeducate, out
dependent the country is on a trained and educated team oriented likable fund for the capitol population, young adult population. we haven't quite recognized the deficit we have their. as for the state level i think a lot has happened. we work of the state level and attempt to put together work of kids through consumption properly taken care of and educated and carried from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more and more business people who get the reality. the hour understanding with the situation as they are increasingly ready to take action in this area that supported salles solomon to resolve problems we find the report last march from pre-que to the cost and difficulty through kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields the reduction in special-education alone. so what is -- there is that the state level this understanding to take place and people can act on it and it can be done on a school district level. so in many respects, the power of technology and communications for this enabling people and local levels to act in ways they cannot at federally and as the act in the regi
comes to town. they had never met. great educators and business leaders and all in the same community and invested and not going anywhere. have to break those barriers. we can facilitate the local level of conversations happening as well. we need that. we need business and education to get a. .. how do know that, why did you do that. at some point they did it because they had always done it that way or they had some sort of rule that wasn't based on any research. and so i sort of went around campaigns some degree skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money, time and resources. as i learned about people starting in academia, these randomized control trials within being adopted by people in the political world. i learned more about the innovations of data and targeting based on, basically revolutionized campaigns in the last decade. this was a major shift, and in addition to all of these new forms of research changing the way campaigns operate is they have this kind of cultural tension between a lot of the old practices and the way,
things, if you go into the educational context and you are talking about mobile on a smart phone and a lot of this access to the broadband through mobile devices in minority communities in particular, i don't view that as an acceptable substitute for a desktop. >> i thought i would talk about why this story intrigues me so much, little bit about the reporting process. i think that is what intrigues me. i will in the first of all, i am sadly not be fully cross graduate. we were just having a lunch and it was the same day that there was a front-page story in "the new york times." going way back, he started to talk about classmates, the other black classmates and father brooks, and i was intrigued. i was intrigued because parents thomas was one of those classmates and i have not read much about the interaction between justice thomas and father brooks. so that just got me intrigued as a business journalist. it was not a classic business story. but i'm always interested in leadership and mentoring. took quite a while to get justice thomas to speak with me, in part because he didn't ne
, that they are trying to figure out how they are going to afford food, how they save for their kids' college education, they need a break. look, nobody likes taxes. i prefer that none of us had to pay taxes, including myself, but ultimately, we have to pay for the core investments that make the economy strong -- >> nobody likes taxes, let's not raise anybody taxes, okay. >> i don't mind paying more. >> businesses in america today are paying second highest tax rates of anywhere in the world. our tax rates for business in america is 35%. ireland, it's 11%. where are companies to go where they can create jobs and where they can do best in business? we need to cut the business tax rate in america. we need to encourage creating jobs, not spread the wealth around. >>> watch and engage with c-span as the presidential candidates meet in the first presidential debate tomorrow at the university of denver. the live debate gets underway at 7 eastern, and jim leher moderates, and after the debate, your reactions and comments taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. >
on this topic. educating all americans about the importance of nextgen. i know we've spent time over the years we think about of course her home state, robust aviation community in a state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with the eaa. and with that said i also juxtapose my thoughts and comments regarding not just a home base of operations that come from, at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion and airspace challenges that we have across places like the new york metropolitan area, philadelphia, and certainly airports here in the metropolitan washington area. all that said, mr. chairman, and certainly do ranking member costello as well, and all of my meetings throughout the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they have been writing own backyard in your own congressional districts across the country. and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. you have held hearings and conducted informational sessions and have always had an open
, this is to help education. so it's not enough to say that free markets work. people feel that they are somehow immoral, it is a somehow semi- corrupt bargain, it will wither away and die. we are trying to say no, free markets don't deliver goods, they deliver goods precisely because it is based on morality and moral optimism of the future. you don't make an investment if you think there's not a future. you don't take a risk the risk if you have an environment of pessimism. you take a risk and you think, i may lose everything, but it just may work, so i will try it. that is facing the future. that is why give that kind of optimism and free markets. >> host: in your book "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't", there is a list of taxes, accounts receivable tax, cigarette tax, corporate income tax from a dog license tax, fishing license tax, irs penalties tax, luxury taxes, marriage license taxes, real estate taxes, i am editing as i go. etc. and etc. why did you include this list of different taxes in your book "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and b
improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secr
that might increase knowledge such as closely following the campaign, education, ideology, gender and the like. it doesn't establish a causal inference but increases the likelihood we have the direction of causality correct. to get a tight causal inference we do need to go to a controlled experiment. we will report one of those in the second panel and its conclusion will be the same. fact checking by in the fact checking sites, sites that develop their fact checking at length, and also the fact check model which is visually claims that we been doing at the annenberg public policy center according to the study which is in panel to produce the same finding. and as result we think that that traditional argument for the causal direction being fact-checking sides in news every on the web as well as standalone sites can increase public knowledge. with that as the background, it's my pleasure to introduce brooks jackson, a factcheck.org who will introduce the first panel. the first panel will forecast what it sees as a possible and we hope not actual deceptions of the presidential debate
said that. i quote him. you know, the problem is, you can't point to anything. i begin to educate him and others about the works progress administration. in 1933 when the works progress administration was put into place by fdr it began to pay for things. it did it in a very unusual way. we will pay for 45% of anything you want to build right now. right now. state and local government got together and came up a long list of building projects that were genuinely shovel ready or which they would make sure we're ready . i . people often in my speeches. my first job of high-school. still open today. it was built with dollars and local dollars. i was talking about this recently was one of my law partner, tim cook. joseph timothy cut is from the jersey. the high-school was constructed in 1936 after -- excuse me, 1935 after a process of 14 months using wpa money. when that money came on line, the city fathers of ramsey, new jersey get together and said, let's build a school. they found the land to raise the money. and was open in 14 months. its stance to this day with a wpa marker on it.
education was considered more of a woman's issue in the legislature until in the 80's when we began connecting it to economic development. and once it became an economic development issue then it's no longer a woman's issue because she takes her children and now it's everybody's issue. >> one thing that younger people in the audience need to understand. for us, for our generation, women and also many many men, feminist was it positive for. it was a good thing, a very good thing and so you have got these women who embraced feminism who think it's a good thing and have now discovered that it's not working anymore. the women i teach don't want to identify with some of them. it's the last thing they want to be identified with and you asked them, do you believe in this and do you believe that in this and they say yes, yes, yes and i just go well the label is a problem. we have many women wanting -- not wanting to use the label and send signals that are so skewed with the label because they know there are group of voters out there who don't see it the way our generation saw it. >> we have
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